IELTS Listening Practice Test 112

ielts-listening-practice-test-112
ielts-listening-practice-test-112

SECTION 1

Questions 1-4

Label the map with the following places:

Write the appropriate letter on your answer sheet.

1-1

Questions 5-10

Answer the following questions using NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS AND/OR A NUMBER for each answer.

5. What time does the library open?

6. What time does the cafeteria close at weekends?

7. When does the sports centre open?

8. When can the outdoor athletics field be used?

9. When will Saturday’s football trials probably end?

10. When will Neil go to watch the trials?

SECTION 2

Questions 11-15

Answer the following questions using NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS AND/OR A NUMBER for each answer.

11. How many London underground lines are there?

12. In which two ways are the lines distinguished from each other?

13. Which zone is Heathrow airport in?

14. On which forms of transport can a one-day Travel card be used?

15. How much cheaper is a typical journey using an Oyster card?

Questions 16-20

Complete the gaps using NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS for each.

16. Put your ticket into the __________________when you want to use an automatic gate.

17. People with _____________________ can use a bigger gate to enter and leave stations.

18. People usually use ___________________ to get from ground level to the trains.

19. ____________________ tell people where to go if they are changing lines.

20. You can find maps in many __________________ at the official website.

SECTION 3

Questions 21-25

Answer the following questions using NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS for each answer.

21. Where is the student from?

22. What does the adviser suggest the student create to manage her time?

23. What does the adviser give the student to help her with time management?

24. What is the problem many students have with the library?

25. Why does this problem exist?

Questions 26-30

Complete the following sentences using NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS for each answer.

26. The student says she is ______________ when she is studying at home.

27. As a result, it might be better for her to __________________from Monday to Friday.

28. The main problem with the student’s assignments Is that they fail to _______________________

29. The adviser has a list of people who, for ___________________ grammar and spelling mistakes.

30. The adviser suggests ____________________ with another student  after lectures over a coffee.

SECTION 4

Questions 37-35

Complete the following sentences using NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS for each gap.

31. Many organisations will pay for the cost of a volunteer’s _________________ to Africa.

32. The presenter describes volunteering as ______________________ than just travelling there.

33. Jobs lasting over a year generally offer a ____________________ to cover expenses.

34. People without ________________________ or extensive education can expect to cover their own costs.

35. The employment of ________________________ is preferred by organisations since projects are long-term.

Questions 36-40

Answer the following questions using NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS for each answer.

36. Which two things are uncommon in rural areas?

37. Which areas generally have more conservative populations?

38. What two new things will your body need to adapt to?

39. Where do many volunteers and travellers relate their experiences?

40. What do you need to work in African countries?

Answer keys:

Section 1, Questions 1-10

  1. B
  2. I

  3. E

  4. C

  5. 8 a.m.

  6. 7 p.m.

  7. 7 a.m.

  8. (during) daylight hours

  9. (at around/ about) 3 p.m.

  10. after lunch

Section 2, Questions 11-20

  1. 12/twelve
  • name, colour

  • (zone) 6

  • underground, bus(es)

  • 10%

  • slot

  • baggage

  • an escalator/escalators

  • Signs

  • foreign languages

  • Section 3, Questions 21 – 30

    21. Germany

    1. (a) schedule
  • (a) leaflet

  • closed/ closes at weekends

  • not enough staff/ too few staff/ no extra staff

  • easily distracted

  • work/study longer hours

  • answer the question

  • a small fee

  • checking notes

  • Section 4, Questions 31 – 40

    1. flight
  • more meaningful

  • (basic) stipend

  • specific skills

  • local people

  • running water, electricity

  • rural ‘

  • food, water

  • online diaries

  • (official) work permit

  • BONUS EXERCISE: GAP-FILLING 

    The texts below are transcript for your IELTS Listening Practice Test. To make the most out of this transcript, we removed some words from the texts and replaced with spaces. You have to fill each space with the missing word by listening to the audio for this IELTS listening practice test.

    SECTION 1

    Simon: Hi Neil! How are you? You look a little [……………………………].

    Neil: Hi Simon! I am. You’re familiar with the campus, aren’t you? I can’t figure out where anything is.

    Simon: Well, let me give you a hand, then. Which [……………………………]do you need to know?

    Neil: First, I need to know where the [……………………………]is. I haven’t registered yet.

    Simon: Alright. You know where the north gate is, don’t you?

    Neil: Yes. It’s up that way – about [……………………………].

    Simon: Sorry, Neil. I’m afraid it’s in that direction and it’s about 500 metres away.

    Neil: Well, that begins to [……………………………]why I cant find anything! So, the south gate…

    Simon: North. Then it’s a little towards the west gate. You can’t miss it, because it’s really big and has a large sign on it.

    Neil: OK. I’ll take your word for it. The second place I need to find is the [……………………………].

    Simon: That’s in the south-west part of the [……………………………]. It’s easy to see because there’s the outdoor [……………………………]stadium nearby.

    Neil: OK. Next, I need to know where Churchill Building is. That’s where I have my [……………………………]tomorrow.

    Simon: That’s back by the library. You know the building – the McDonald Building – where our [……………………………]is?

    Neil: Yes, that’s right by the east gate, isn’t it?

    Simon: Right. Well, the Churchill Building is [……………………………], well, almost opposite that.

    Neil: Not that small building directly opposite?

    Simon: No, the larger one beside it.

    Neil: Got it. OK. Last one. Where’s the [……………………………]? I know it’s next to the [……………………………].

    Simon: And can you see the bookshop? •

    Neil: Well… hang on… It’s right there – here in the centre of the campus!

    Simon: A great central [……………………………], if you ask me!

    Neil: What time is the library open?

    Simon: It’s open from [……………………………].

    Neil: And the cafeteria?

    Simon: 8 a.m. until 7 p.m.

    Neil: Is that every day? Someone said that it isn’t open so long at the weekends.

    Simon: No, it’s every day.

    Neil: And the sports centre?

    Simon: Now, if I [……………………………]rightly, that opens at 7 a.m. and closes at 9 p.m., but the outdoor [……………………………]field can only be used during daylight hours since there’s no [……………………………].

    Neil: You play sports, don’t you, Simon?

    Simon: I do. I’ve signed up for the football team trials this coming weekend and I was on the athletics team at school.

    Neil: When are the trials? I don’t play football, but I enjoy watching.

    Simon: They’re on Saturday, starting at [……………………………]. The organisers said that we should [……………………………]to be there until [……………………………], probably until around three.

    Neil: Well, I’ve got things to do in the morning, but I’ll come along after lunch. I hope you [……………………………]until then!

    Simon: So do I! I think that in the morning, they’ll be aiming to sort out the people with [……………………………]from the no-hopers. Then, in the afternoon, they’ll be sorting out who’s the best.

    Neil: OK. Well, good luck with that. I’ll see if Leslie wants to come along.

    Simon: OK. See you Saturday.

    SECTION 2

    Presenter:

    Welcome to this latest lecture on living in London. Today, we’re going to look at [……………………………]and I’d like to start with the London [……………………………]system – also called “the tube” because of the shape of the [……………………………]. First, you need to learn your lines. There are 12 different [……………………………], each with its own name, for example, the Piccadilly line, the [……………………………]. Each line is a different colour on the map of the underground system. You can find the map in the ticket hall at each underground [……………………………], and usually on the [……………………………]as well. Sections of the map are also displayed in the [……………………………]of the underground trains. Before you begin, it helps to know which line you are starting on and on which line your [……………………………]can be found. If they are on different lines, look at the map to see where the two lines cross, and note the name of the [……………………………]where they meet – that is where you have to change trains. If the two lines do not cross, keep looking until you find a third line that crosses both of the other two. Then you will need to change trains [……………………………].

    You can buy a [……………………………]from one of the automatic machines or from the ticket office. Either way, you need to know the name of the [……………………………]you are going to. You also need to know whether you want a “single” ticket, which is valid just to get you to your [……………………………]or a “return”, which gets you there and back again. Fares are based on a [……………………………]: the more zones you travel through, the more expensive your fare is. There are six zones, with zone 1 covering central London and zone 6 covering the [……………………………]of the system, including, for example, Heathrow [……………………………]. Most of the underground maps show which stations are in which zones. A single ticket for travel through all [……………………………]currently costs [……………………………]. Depending on how far you are travelling and how many [……………………………]you need to make, it may be cheaper to buy a one-day. Travel card, which gives you [……………………………]travel on all London underground and bus [……………………………]the day you buy it. A one-day Travel card covering all six zones currently costs [……………………………]. You can also buy an Oyster card. This is the best option if you are going to be in London for a long time. You get a [……………………………]on all tickets — usually about [……………………………] — and you don’t have to [……………………………]to buy tickets. Just buy credit for your card and then use it as [……………………………]when you enter and leave underground stations at the start and finish of your journeys.

    At underground stations you must pass through an [……………………………]. Put your ticket into the slot to the right of the gate. When the gate opens, pass through. As you pass through, your ticket will [……………………………]from another slot on the top. Pull your ticket out and take it with you; you need it at the end of your [……………………………]. This is the same procedure for Travel cards. With Oyster cards, you hold your card over the card reader at [……………………………]automatic gates. If you have [……………………………]with you, you can go through a special, larger gate where you can pass through more easily. Show your ticket to an [……………………………]and ask him or her to let you through this gate.

    Most stations have long [……………………………]leading to and from the trains. Try to stand to the right-hand side, leaving space for people to walk past you on the left. When changing trains, get off at the station where the line you are on crosses the line you need. Follow the signs for the line you need, and the [……………………………]you want to go in. When you leave the system, you must pass through an automatic gate again to leave the station. Put your ticket in the slot as before. If you bought a [……………………………]or a Travel card, your ticket will pop up for you to collect again, so that you can use it later. If you bought a [……………………………], or if you are. on the return trip of your return ticket, your ticket will stay in the [……………………………].

    To find out more about the London underground, check the official website: [……………………………]. This site also has the map and information in [……………………………]foreign languages. Now, let’s move on to…

    SECTION 3

    Adviser: Good afternoon. How can I help you?

    Student: Good afternoon. My name is Helena Schwarz. I have an [……………………………]at three.

    Adviser: Ah, yes. Come in. Please, take a seat. … Now, what can I do for you?

    Student: Well, I need some advice about my stûdies. I’m a [……………………………]student – from Germany – and, well, I heard that this is the place to come.

    Adviser: It certainly is. So, what kind of problems are you having? It’s quite normal for students to meet problems, [……………………………]overseas students who might not be [……………………………]with the British way of life or education system.

    Student: Well, ray first problem is the [……………………………].

    Adviser: That’s a common problem, even with British students.

    Student: It seems to me that the biggest difference between university and [……………………………]school is that university students have to do a lot of work on their own, and it’s sometimes useful to get [……………………………]on how to take control of your time and work effectively. ‘

    Adviser: You’re right. The obvious thing to do is to make a [……………………………]and stick to it. Bear in mind that there is enough time to do the work and enough time for [……………………………]activities.

    Student: You mean that I shouldn’t overload myself.

    Adviser: Right, but [……………………………], be careful to spread your work out over the weeks and months. Don’t do anything for a while, then get [……………………………]because you have little time to get [……………………………]finished.

    Student: Yes, that’s clear.

    Adviser: We get a lot of students coming to us with that problem, so we’ve produced a leaflet about it. You should have [……………………………]one during [……………………………], but sometimes … well, here you are.

    Student: Thank you. I’ll read it carefully later.

    Adviser: OK. And feel free to come back if you have any questions about it.

    Student: OK. My second problem is with research.

    Adviser: Are you going to complain that the library isn’t open at the weekends? ,

    Student: How did you guess?

    Adviser: We get so many students complaining about that. We are trying to get that [……………………………], but… well, to be honest, the library [……………………………]already work long shifts and unless we can get extra staff, the library has to [……………………………]closed at the weekends.

    Student: I understand, but…

    Adviser: I know. It makes [……………………………]your time even more important.

    Make sure that you get all the books you need from the library before the weekend. Then, [……………………………]some of your weekend time to making notes from the books at the weekend.

    Student: The problem is that I’m easily [……………………………]when I’m working at home rather than in the library.

    Adviser: Well, an [……………………………]strategy is to work longer hours during the week, when the library is open, and do no work at all at the weekends. Sometimes, it’s very useful to forget about studies for a day or two each week.

    Student: Yes. That might be better for me. I can [……………………………]on my work in the library and then leave the weekends free. Also, I have some problems – with my essay assignments. Could you have a look at these and tell me what you think?

    Adviser: Certainly… Ah, I see. Well, even if you plan your writing [……………………………], this can come to nothing if the assignment doesn’t actually answer the question. That really is the most important thing to remember. You must read the question [……………………………]care¬fully and give it a great deal of thought before you even start planning or writing your first draft. It’s also [……………………………]to check your work for [……………………………]. Everybody makes them, and they can [……………………………]the professor marking the work. So, always take time at the end to check what you have written. Many overseas students ask a British student to check their work for them. I have a short list of people who will do this for a small fee if you’d like it.

    Student: That’s OK. I have [……………………………]British friends. I’m sure I can bribe them to check my grammar and spelling. Good. Anything else?

    Adviser: Yes, there is. I find it hard to keep up sometimes in [……………………………].

    Student: Do you have any tips for me? I was thinking of recording them using an [……………………………]. Then I can listen to it again [……………………………]and…

    Adviser: Well, a lot of people find them useful, but some people point out that you might never actually have time to listen to the recording again. Something else you could try is checking your notes with a friend after the lecture. Go for a [……………………………]or something.

    Student: Yes. That’s a good idea. Thanks. Thank you very much for your help.

    Adviser: That’s what I’m here for!

    SECTION 4

    Presenter:

    Good morning, everybody. I’m Jane Winter and I’m here to tell you a little about the [……………………………]of volunteer work in Africa. If you’re looking for volunteer work in Africa there are plenty of [……………………………]available. Let’s look at the different types of volunteer opportunities available in Africa, what to [……………………………]when volunteering in Africa and stories from [……………………………]who have worked in Africa. Volunteering means something different to almost every [……………………………]you come across. Some [……………………………]will cover your flight and cost of living while you are working and some are true “volunteer” projects and [……………………………]you to cover all costs for the [……………………………]of the experience. If you are looking for a more [……………………………]way to spend a few months in Africa than simply travelling around, [……………………………]is a wonderful way to spend your time. Most jobs that last less than a year or so are going to be the ones you have to pay for. Jobs that require a [……………………………]of more than a year will often offer a basic [……………………………]to cover some of your costs.

    Whether you get paid and how much you get paid will also depend on your [……………………………]and how much they are in [……………………………].’Most paid volunteer opportunities in Africa are available to those who have a university [……………………………]and/or a practical skill. Engineers, doctors, nurses, [……………………………], emergency relief [……………………………]and teachers are among the most asked for by volunteer agencies. If an organisation doesn’t require you to have [……………………………]then you will usually have to pay your own [……………………………]as a volunteer. In general most organisations working in Africa try and [……………………………]as many local people as possible rather than [……………………………], since the projects should continue long after you have [……………………………]home. So don’t take it personally if your [……………………………]to help people in Africa is rejected, it may just be that a [……………………………]is better suited to do the job.

    What should you expect when you volunteer to work in Africa? Conditions are usually basic. Most volunteer [……………………………]take place in rural areas where you may not have ready [……………………………]to running water and electricity. Housing can be very basic and you will likely be staying with [……………………………]. A word about cultural [……………………………]. As in most countries in the world rural communities are usually more traditional than [……………………………]centres. As you will be working closely with the local population you will have to dress and behave in [……………………………]with what is acceptable locally. General pace of life and work is much slower than in the west. Don’t expect any organisation to run [……………………………]and without [……………………………]. Getting sick can be a problem. If you’re spending more than just a few weeks in Africa, especially sub-Saharan Africa, your chances of getting [……………………………]or [……………………………]will also increase. Make sure you take all the medicine and [……………………………]you need. The organisation you work with should [……………………………]you about health issues and don’t forget that local nurses and doctors will have plenty of experience with these common [……………………………]—probably more than your doctor at home. Initially you may also have some problems getting used to different food and water.

    Anyone who has [……………………………]in Africa will probably tell you that the biggest impact their [……………………………]had was not on the community but on [……………………………]. Spending time immersed in another culture will change the way you look at life and is part of the [……………………………]of volunteering. Before you decide to volunteer in Africa you may be interested to learn what the [……………………………]experiences are of people already in the field. Later, we’ll look at a selection of volunteer stories and experiences from [……………………………]. There are many volunteers and [……………………………]who keep online diaries of their experiences. These contain some [……………………………]tips about working, travelling and living in Africa. Before that, just a quick word about work pex*mits in Africa. Many people who travel around Africa may wish to stay and work. But just as in [……………………………]or the US, every [……………………………]country will require you to get an official work permit. In most cases these laws exist to stop foreigners getting jobs that local people may be [……………………………]for. Unemployment is bad enough [……………………………]Africa so don’t take a job that a local person could do. Now, let’s look at a few people’s experiences…

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