IELTS Listening Practice Test 90

SECTION 1

Researcher: Good morning, sir. Are you enjoying the Perfect Home [……………………………..]?

Man:    Yes, I am. It’s very interesting. I’m planning on buying a home in the near [……………………………..]and this exhibition has given me some great ideas.

Researcher: I’m [……………………………..]a survey on behalf of the exhibition [……………………………..]. Can I take a few minutes of your time to ask you some questions?

Man:    Yes, of course. Can we sit down? I’m rather [……………………………..]after walking around the different exhibits and stands.

Researcher: Of course. I’ll ask my colleague to get you a drink. Coffee?

Man:    Yes, please. Milk and one sugar. … Now, I [……………………………..]you’ll need my name?

Researcher: Yes, Mr…?

Man:    Glass, William Glass. Double S.

Researcher: Do you have an email address, Mr Glass?

Man:    I do. It’s [……………………………..].

Researcher: I’ll just fill in the date-[……………………………..]. Right. What do you do, Mr Glass?

Man:    I work at the Ministry of Culture. I’m a civil servant.

Researcher: How old are you?

Man:    [……………………………..].

Researcher: And your marital status?

Man:    I live with my [……………………………..].

Researcher: Right. Single. Do you have any children?

Man:    No.

Researcher: And could I ask how much you earn?

Man:    Well, I’d rather not say, to be honest.

Researcher: Could you just look at these ranges and say where you fit in?

Man:    Oh, OK. There. [……………………………..].

Researcher: OK, that’s the personal information I need. Now I’d like to ask you about the [……………………………..]you live in. Do you live in a house or a flat and how big is it?

Man:    I live in a flat… about 100 square metres. A little under.

Researcher: Do you rent or is it vours?

Man:    I have a [……………………………..].

Researcher: Now, you said that you were [……………………………..]buying another home in the near future. Are you intending to get a house?

Man:    Yes, I am. Just a small one.

Researcher: What’s your [……………………………..]like?

Man:    Well, the bank has said that they’ll allow me a mortgage of up to [……………………………..]pounds, so enough for a small house.

Researcher: When you say a small house, what kind of size were you thinking?

Man:    Oh, perhaps a little under [……………………………..], with a garden of, oh, I don’t know, maybe 20 square metres.

Researcher: And when do you think you’ll buy the [……………………………..]?

Man:    Within the next six months … hopefully sooner.

Researcher: Ah, here’s your coffee. Thank you John. … Mr Glass, have you seen any particular properties that you are interested in?

Man:    Yes, I have. There’s an interesting [……………………………..]going on in the district of Haydon. The government has joined up with a private company to offer [……………………………..]housing there. It’s on the [……………………………..]of the city, but the transportation links look excellent: regular buses to the [……………………………..]station. That means that it will only take me an hour to get to work in the morning: not much more than it takes now.

Researcher: They’re going to have some nice [……………………………..]nearby too.

Man:    Yes. I’m looking forward to the cinema complex and the shopping centre, of course. I love films and shopping will be [……………………………..].

Researcher: There’s a golf course nearby too.

Man:    Well, I’m sure many of the other residents will [……………………………..]it. I’ll join the fitness centre instead. Is your company involved in the development in any way?

Researcher: Oh, my company just does research. However, the private developer [……………………………..]in that project is our client. The smaller houses are about [……………………………..], which suits you perfectly.

Man:    Yes. Property is so expensive in this city nowadays. It’s good that the government is beginning to help those of us who don’t make large amounts of money.

Researcher: Well, thank you very much. I’d like to give you these free gifts.

Man:    Oh, well, thank you very much! A [……………………………..]and pen are always useful and the T-shirt will come in useful in the summer. Goodbye.

Researcher: Goodbye.

SECTION 2

Presenter: Welcome everyone. My name is Pamela Stark and I’m here to tell you about international students and [……………………………..]in this country. Let me start by stating the most important thing first-your [……………………………..]to work in this country while you’re here as an [……………………………..]student depends on whether you are: an EEA national, that is a [……………………………..]Economic Area national, not an EEA national with a stamp saying ’[……………………………..] on working’ in your passport, or not an EEA national with a ‘prohibition on working’ stamp in your [……………………………..].

Now, if you are an EEA national, you can work freely in this country. You can work for an [……………………………..]or be self-employed. If your [……………………………..], such as your spouse or children, come with you to this country, they can work here as well, no matter what their [……………………………..]. This is thanks to EEA rules and these rules also mean that students from this country studying in other EEA member-states can work [……………………………..]too.

Now, if you have come here for a course lasting more than [……………………………..], the immigration [……………………………..]automatically put a ‘restriction on working’ in your passport. It is worded in the following way: ‘work, and any changes, must be authorised’. This allows you to work under certain [……………………………..]. The first of these conditions is that, during term-time, you can work no more than [……………………………..]per week, but you can work longer if the work [……………………………..]is an essential part of your course, for example, the work period of a sandwich course. The second condition is that you cannot run your own business, be [……………………………..], or work as a professional sports person or entertainer. The third condition is that you cannot take up a [……………………………..]full-time position, though you can do full-time, short-term work during the holidays.

If you are enrolled on a course lasting more than six months and you do not have this stamp, speak to an adviser at your [……………………………..]immediately. Do not start work! It may be that a mistake has been made that needs to be corrected. However, even if a mistake has been made, if you start work, you are breaking the law. This could have serious [……………………………..]for your future stay here.

Another point that I would like to make is that even if you expect to be given a ‘[……………………………..] on working’, or already have one, you cannot include vour earnings as evidence of your ability to support yourself financially. However, there are two exceptions to this rule. One is if you will be [……………………………..]a publicly funded college or university and the institution [……………………………..]that it will employ you and can provide details of your pay. The other is if you will be attending a sandwich course at a publicly [……………………………..]college or university and the [……………………………..]guarantees that there will be a job for you and can provide details of your pay. In those two cases, you can include these earnings as evidence of your ability to [……………………………..]yourself.

If you are from a country outside the EEA and your course in this country lasts six months or less, the [……………………………..]authorities are likely to have put a ‘prohibition on working’ in your passport. It is worded as follows: ‘No work or recourse to public funds’. This means that you are not [……………………………..]to work at all while you are here. If you have come for a course of six months or less and want to be able to work, for example because your course [……………………………..]a work placement, you should have [……………………………..]this when you applied for entry [……………………………..]or when you landed, if you did not get entry clearance in advance. If you have already been given a ‘prohibition on working’, you may be able to apply to have it changed. Ask the [……………………………..]officer or student adviser at your [……………………………..]for advice. If you can provide evidence that you will be on a [……………………………..], your passport stamp will normally be changed. However, do not begin your placement before getting your [……………………………..]changed! Again, that is illegal and could affect your future studies in this country.

Now, let’s take a look at the [……………………………..]if you are a non-EEA national and have brought your spouse or children with you. In that case, their [……………………………..]will show the conditions that apply to them. They may be given either a ‘prohibition on working’ – as explained above, this means they are not allowed to work-or they may have been given an entry clearance or stamp that does not mention [……………………………..]at all. In this case, they are free to work in here without any [……………………………..]other than the right to start their own business. They will have been given this stamp if they have shown [……………………………..]that you, the student, have been given permission to be here for at least 12 months.

Finally, let’s take a look at working after your course ends, if you are a non- EEA citizen. Until now, the [……………………………..]of non-EEA students have found it difficult to obtain [……………………………..]to stay on in this country after their studies for work, apart from if they were training for a professional or specialist [……………………………..]before returning home. However, the government is currently reviewing its policies, and some changes may be introduced that make it easier for students to stay on for work. You can find information about the current [……………………………..]if you click on ‘work permits’ on the website [……………………………..]on the leaflet 1 have given you. I should say that special [……………………………..]have always applied to doctors, dentists and nurses, and these will continue.

SECTION 3

Katarina: So, Jatinder and Ali, how did you deal with [……………………………..]shock when you first came here to study?

Jatinder: Well, Katarina, when I first arrived in the UK, I was just so [……………………………..]to be living in a foreign country: away from my parents… that 1 just didn’t really notice anything at first. How about you, Ali?

Ali:      Yeah. Same here. That’s quite typical, isn’t it? Everything seems new and [……………………………..]. But, after this initial [……………………………..]wears off, all the new experiences may begin to [……………………………..]you. Things that you found exciting at first may now seem strange and a little [……………………………..]. Even minor differences, such as being unable to buy your usual brands of [……………………………..]products, can add to the sense of [……………………………..].

Jatinder: Yes. That’s right. Then you may start to experience sudden mood changes and strong [……………………………..], feeling lost, disoriented, and even [……………………………..]and resentful. Most of all, you may wish you were back among the familiar people and places at home. All [……………………………..]students can experience culture shock in some form … even those coming from countries with very similar [……………………………..]to those in the UK. It is important to understand that this reaction is [……………………………..]normal and that it will pass.

Katarina: OK. So what suggestions do you have for me?

Ali:      Well, I made sure that I arrived early. I got here about ten days, yeah, ten days before most of the other students, so that I could settle in before things got busy. Many [……………………………..]run special induction programmes for international students in the week before term begins. A typical induction programme [……………………………..]a tour of the college or university, an overview of its [……………………………..]and how to use them, help with registering for your [……………………………..]programme, and social events where you can meet other students and [……………………………..]. This can help you to start to get used to your new environment.

Katarina: Yeah, 1 heard about those … but too late [……………………………..]. Jatinder, did you go on an induction course like Ali?

Jatinder: No. I wish I had, but my parents wouldn’t let me go a day sooner than absolutely necessary. It was very annoying.

Ali:      Every university has counsellors who can give you practical advice on [……………………………..]to your new environment. These people have special training in offering advice and support, and they understand the [……………………………..]you face. They can listen to you [……………………………..], offer practical suggestions, and refer you to other professionals if necessary. Your personal tutor and the staff in the international office of your [……………………………..]or university can also be helpful.

Jatinder: Have you heard about the ‘buddy’ or [……………………………..]system? Students who have been at the university or college for a longer period give advice to new arrivals, and are available for help and [……………………………..]throughout the year. There is information on [……………………………..]such as these at the students’ union or the international student [……………………………..]will help you become involved. I used the system when I arrived and found it really opened some doors [……………………………..]: you know, I got to meet lots of people, like Ali, right?

Ali:      Right! Katarina, I think that it’s also important to keep in touch with home. Use the telephone, e-mail and [……………………………..]mail to keep in contact with your friends and family at home. In larger towns or cities with large international [……………………………..], like this one, you may be able to find people from your country. Spend some time with them. Many international students find that it helps to make contact with people from a similar [……………………………..]because they understand what you are going through. Spending time with people from your country can also be a relaxing break from the ‘[……………………………..]‘ of the UK. You can speak your own [……………………………..], eat your own foods and talk about what is going on back home.

Jatinder: Yes. And don’t forget that the university has a variety of cultural societies, as well as an active international students’ [……………………………..]: ask at the student union. They may also have information about national or cultural groups outside the [……………………………..].

Ali:      Another thing you should try to do is to keep healthy and active. Make an effort to exercise regularly … you will feel better and it can also be a good way to meet people. Eat a [……………………………..]and find a shop that sells food from your part of the world, so that you can enjoy familiar meals when you want them.

Katarina: That’s a really good idea! I’ll sign up at the university sports centre this afternoon!

Jatinder: I don’t know whether you believe in God, but if you do, remembering your [……………………………..]can be helpful and [……………………………..]. If you follow a religion and worship [……………………………..]at home, you can keep this up while you are in the UK … it can provide a sense of [……………………………..]and be a link to your life at home. Every major religion in the world is [……………………………..]here, and most large cities have Muslim, Hindu, Sikh and Buddhist centres, as well as [……………………………..]and churches of all [……………………………..]. The student union keeps a list of places of worship.

Katarina: I’m not [……………………………..], but I do see your point. So, there’s plenty I can do … practical things, I mean. And above all, I need to remind myself that culture shock is normal: and [……………………………..].

SECTION 4

Presenter: Welcome to this presentation on our online course, An Introduction to Electronics, which runs over [……………………………..]and starts on 8th May. Let me just say at the beginning that if you cannot make this date, please send me an email about the next course and I will send you a list of future dates. My email is the front of your [……………………………..].

Now, let me tell you something about the course. Based upon our popular two- day Overview of Electronics course, this new online course will introduce you to the basic ideas behind electronic circuits. The course will consist of ten units each of which will [……………………………..]around five hours of study. The course is designed to act both as an introductory course and as a [……………………………..]course ể After taking the course you should have a good idea of how [……………………………..]work and how they are made. In particular, the course focuses on the design of a Hi-Fi amplifier. The course is limited to “[……………………………..]” where signals are represented by continuously variable [……………………………..]and will not cover “digital electronics” where signals are represented by [……………………………..]numbers.

Students should normally have a reasonable [……………………………..]in school Maths and Science. Study to GCSE-level is sufficient for most of the course, though study to A-level will enable a full understanding of the more advanced topics. Students on the course will be [……………………………..]with a copy of Terrv Fit’s “Fundamentals of Electronics11. This will be used for directed reading, [……………………………..]and further study. It also serves as a useful reference source. The student should have PC available and a basic knowledge of Windows in order to use the [……………………………..]software from the CD-ROM that comes with this book.

Now, who is this course designed for? This course is [……………………………..]for individuals with little prior knowledge of electrical or electronic engineering who want to get a feeling for the [……………………………..]and for individuals whose knowledge is “rusty” or out of date. A previous exposure to basic science and maths at school will be [……………………………..]; maximum benefit will accrue to those who have [……………………………..]higher education in a technical subject or who have experience in a related area. Typical [……………………………..]may include those in jobs which bring them into contact with electronics, such as drafts persons, PCB designers, production and assembly [……………………………..]and software designers, those working with electronic products, such as [……………………………..]and sales persons, those coming into electronics from a related field, such as scientists or [……………………………..], and those simply curious to find out about this all – pervasive technology.

The benefits of this course are that, first, it gives you a quick [……………………………..]into modem electronics. It also puts [……………………………..]on practical devices and systems. Unlike many other courses, no prior knowledge is assumed, but previous exposure to school-level science and maths is [……………………………..]. Fourthly, it can be used as a refresher course. Fifth, there is the benefit of getting hands-on simulations and, finally, all [……………………………..]completing the course will receive a University of Oxford Certificate of Completion.

The course will be presented by Brian Williams, who started his career working as an electronic engineer for British [……………………………..]. Brian then became a lecturer and has taught electronics at Oxford University & Jesus College for longer than he cares to admit. He is also an active [……………………………..]and researcher. Brian is a [……………………………..]lecturer and particularly enjoys teaching introductory-level courses and interacting with students.

Now, finally, let me just quickly go through the course [……………………………..]. Please remember that this course is intended for [……………………………..]with limited prior knowledge of electrical or electronic engineering.

Unit 1 looks at electronic systems, including an introduction to the idea of signals [……………………………..]by voltages; wires used to transfer signals and voltage from one place or box or component to another; and boxes or components [……………………………..]voltages, particularly [……………………………..]them). Unit 2 takes a look at Ohms’ Law: The linear relationship of voltage & current and the concept of resistance. It also looks at resistors &[……………………………..]networks. Unit 3 focuses on Op-Amps, providing an introduction to the ideal op-amp and its [……………………………..]. The next slide tells us that Unit 4 is [……………………………..]with capacitors and AC circuits: the theory and applications of [……………………………..]and their use in transient and AC circuits. Unit 5 looks at frequency response and filters, including both passive and active filters. Unit 6 takes a look at [……………………………..], inductors and transformers. Looking at this next slide, we can see that Unit 7 covers RL & RLC circuits, including tuned filters and [……………………………..]networks. Unit 8 is entitled ‘An Introduction to [……………………………..]. It covers diodes and [……………………………..]-both theory and applications. This unit also looks at special purpose diodes. Unit 9 covers transistors, particularly bipolar [……………………………..]– including theory and typical [……………………………..]. The final unit, Unit 10, is a review unit with a little look at further applications.

 

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