IELTS Reading Practice Test 29 with Answers

IELTS Reading Recent Actual Test 29 in 2016 with Answer Key (1)
IELTS Reading Recent Actual Test 29 in 2016 with Answer Key (1)

Section 1

You should spend about 20 minutes on Questions 1-13 which are based on Reading Passage 1

Working in the movies

When people ask French translator Virginie Verdier what she does for a living, it must be tempting to say enigmatically: ‘Oh me? I’m in the movies’. It’s strictly true, but her starring role is behind the scenes. As translating goes, it doesn’t get more entertaining or glamorous than subtitling films. If you’re very lucky, you get to work on the new blockbuster films before they’re in the cinema, and if you’re just plain lucky, you get to work on the blockbuster movies that are going to video or DVD.

The process starts when you get the original script and a tape. ‘We would start with translating and adapting the film script. The next step is what we call ‘timing’, which means synchronising the subtitles to the dialogue and pictures.’ This task requires discipline. You play the film, listen to the voice and the subtitles are up on your screen ready to be timed. You insert your subtitle when you hear the corresponding dialogue and delete .it when the dialogue finishes. The video tape carries a time code which runs in hours, minutes, seconds and frames. Think of it as a clock. The subtitling unit has an insert key to capture the time code where you want the subtitle to appear. When you press the delete key, it captures the time code where you want the subtitle to disappear. So each subtitle wouldSubtitling is an exacting part of the translation profession. Melanie Leyshon talks to Virginie Verdier of London translation company VSI about the glamour and the grind. Virginie is quick to point out that this is as exacting as any translating job. You work hard. It’s not all entertainment as you are doing the translating. You need all the skills of a good translator and those of a top-notch editor. You have to be precise and, of course, much more concise than in traditional translation work.

have an ‘in’ point and an ‘out’ point which represent the exact time when the subtitle comes in and goes out. This process is then followed by a manual review, subtitle by subtitle, and time- codes are adjusted to improve synchronisation and respect shot changes. This process involves playing the film literally frame by frame as it is essential the subtitles respect the visual rhythm of the film.’

Different subtitlers use different techniques. ‘I would go through the film and do the whole translation and then go right back from the beginning and start the timing process. But you could do it in different stages, translate let’s say 20 minutes of the film, then time this section and translate the next 20 minutes, and so on. It’s just a different method.’

For multi-lingual projects, the timing is done first to create what is called a ‘spotting list’, a subtitle template, which is in effect a list of English subtitles pre-timed and edited for translation purposes. This is then translated and the timing is adapted to the target language with the help of the translator for quality control.

‘Like any translation work, you can’t hurry subtitling,’ says Virginie. ‘If subtitles are translated and timed in a rush, the quality will be affected and it will show.’ Mistakes usually occur when the translator does not master the source language and misunderstands the original dialogue. ‘Our work also involves checking and reworking subtitles when the translation is not up to standard. However, the reason for redoing subtitles is not just because of poor quality translation. We may need to adapt subtitles to a new  version of the film: the time code may be different.  The film may have been edited or the subtitles may have been created for the cinema rather than video. If subtitles were done for cinema on 35mm, we would need to reformat the timing for video, as subtitles could be out of synch or too fast. If the translation is good, we would obviously respect the work of the original translator.’

On a more practical level, there are general subtitling rules  to follow, says Virginie. ‘Subtitles should appear at the bottom of the screen and usually in the centre.’ She say that different countries use different standards and rules. In Scandinavian countries and Holland, for example, subtitles are traditionally left justified. Characters usually appear in white with a thin black border for easy reading against a white or light background. We can also use different colours for each speaker when subtitling for the hearing impaired. Subtitles should have a maximum of two lines and the maximum number of characters on each line should be between 32 and 39. Our company standard is 37 (different companies and countries have different standards).’

Translators often have a favourite genre, whether it’s war films, musicals, comedies (one of the most difficult because of the subtleties and nuances of comedy in different countries), drama or corporate programmes. Each requires a certain tone and style. ‘VSI employs American subtitlers, which is incredibly useful as many of the films we subtitle are American,’ says Virginie. ‘For an English person, it would not be so easy to understand the meaning behind typically American expressions, and vice-versa.’

Questions 1-5

Complete the flow chart below.

Use NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS from the passage for each answer.

Write your answers in boxes 1-5 cm your answer sheet.

THE SUBTITLING PROCESS

Stage 1: Translate and adapt the script

Stage 2:  1……………….………. -matching the subtitles to what said Involves recording time codes by using the 2…………………………………..and…………………………. keys.

Stage 3: 3……………………. – in order to make the 4…………..……………………………. better

Multi – lingual project

Stage 1: Produce something known as a 5………………………………………………………..and translate that

Questions 6-9

Do the following statements agree with the information given in Reading Passage 1?

In boxes 6-9 on your answer sheet write

TRUE                 if the statement agrees with the information

FALSE                if the statement contradicts the information

NOT GIVEN       if there is no information on this

6  For translators, all subtitling work on films is desirable.

7  Subtitling work involves a requirement that does not apply to other translation work.

8  Some subtitling techniques work better than others.

9  Few people are completely successful at subtitling comedies.

Questions 10-13

Complete the sentences below with words from Reading Passage I.

Use NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS for each answer.

Write your answers in boxes 10—13 on your answer sheet.

10  Poor subtitling can be a result of the subtitler not being excellent at…………………..…….

11  To create subtitles for a video version of a film, it may be necessary to………………….…..

12  Subtitles usually have a………………………………………. around them.

13  Speakers can be distinguished from each ocher for the benefit of…………………………………

 

Section 2

You should spend about 20 minutes on Questions 14—26 which are based on Reading Passage 2 on pages 100 and ¡01.

 Complementary and alternative medicine

WHAT DO SCIENTISTS IN BRITAIN THINK ABOUT ALTERNATIVE’ THERAPIES? OR LA KENNEDY READS A SURPRISING SURVEY

Is complementary medicine hocus-pocus or does it warrant large-scale scientific investigation? should science range beyond conventional medicine and conduct research on alternative medicine and the supposed growing links between mind and body? This will be hotly debated at the British Association for the Advancement of Science.

One Briton in five uses complementary medicine, and according to the most recent Mintel survey, one in ten uses herbalism or homoeopathy. Around £130 million is spent on oils, potions and pills every year in Britain, and the complementary and alternative medicine industry is estimated to be worth £1.6 billion. With the help of Professor Edzard Ernst, Laing chair of complementary medicine at The Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth, we asked scientists their views on complementary and alternative medicine. Seventy-five scientists, in fields ranging from molecular biology to neuroscience, replied.

Surprisingly, our sample of scientists was twice as likely as the public to use some form of complementary medicine, at around four in 10 compared with two in 10 of the general population. Three quarters of scientific users believed they were effective. Acupuncture, chiropractic and osteopathy were the most commonly used complementary treatments among scientists and more than 55 per cent believed these were more effective than a placebo and should be available to all on the National Health Service.

Scientists appear to place more trust in the more established areas of complementary and alternative medicine, such as acupuncture, chiropractic and osteopathy, for which there are professional bodies and recognised training, than therapies such as aromatherapy and spiritual healing. ‘Osteopathy is now a registered profession requiring a certified four-year degree before you can advertise and practise,’ said one neuroscientist who used the therapy. Nearly two thirds of the scientists who replied to our survey believed that aromatherapy and homoeopathy were no better than placebos, with almost a half thinking the same of herbalism and spiritual thinking. Some of the comments we received were scathing, even though one in ten of our respondents had used homeopathy. ‘Aromatherapy and homoeopathy are scientifically nonsensical,’ said one molecular biologist from the University of Bristol. Dr Romke Bron, a molecular biologist at the Medical Research Council Centre at King’s College London, added: ‘Homoeopathy is a big scam and I am convinced that if someone sneaked into a homoeopathic pharmacy and swapped labels, nobody would notice anything.’

Two centuries after homeopathy was introduced, it still lacks a watertight demonstration that it works. Scientists are happy that the resulting solutions and sugar baffled by how they can do anything.

Both complementary and conventional medicine should be used in routine health care, according to followers of the ‘intergrated health approach’, who want to treat an individual ‘as a whole’. But the scientists who responded to our survey s expressed serious concerns about this approach, with more than half believing that integrated medicine was an attempt to bypass rigorous scientific testing. Dr Bron said: ‘There is an awful lot of bad science going on in alternative medicine and the general public has a hard time to distinguish between scientific myth and fact. It is absolutely paramount to maintain rigorous quality control in health care. Although the majority of alternative health workers mean well, there are just too many frauds out there preying on vulnerable people.’

One molecular biologist from the University of Warwick admitted that ‘by doing this poll I have realised how shamefully little I understand about alternative therapy. Not enough scientific research has been performed. There is enough anecdotal evidence to suggest that at least some of the alternative therapies are effective for some people, suggesting this is an area ripe for research.’

When asked if complementary and alternative medicine should get more research funding, scientists believed the top three (acupuncture, chiropractic and osteopathy) should get money, as should herbalism. It seems that therapies based on physical manipulation or a known action – like the active ingredients in a herb on a receptor in the body – are the ones that the scientific community has faith in. Less than a quarter thought that therapies such as aromatherapy, homoeopathy and spiritual healing should get any funding.

Scientists believed that the ‘feelgood’ counselling effect of complementary medicine and the time taken to listen to patients’ problems was what worked, rather than any medicinal effect. In contrast, the average visit to the doctor lasts only eight minutes, says the British Medical Association. Dr Stephen Nurrish, a molecular biologist at University College London, said: ‘Much of the benefit people get from complementary medicine is the time to talk to someone and be listened to sympathetically, something that is now lacking from medicine in general.’

But an anonymous neuroscientist at King’s College London had a more withering view of this benefit: ‘On the validity of complementary and alternative medicines, no one would dispute that ‘feeling good’ is good for your health, but why discriminate between museum-trip therapy, patting-a-dog therapy and aromatherapy? Is it because only the latter has a cadre of professional ‘practitioners’?’

There are other hardline scientists who argue that there should be no such thing as complementary and alternative medicine. As Professor David Moore, director of the Medical Research Council’s Institute for Hearing Research, said: ‘Either a treatment works or it doesn’t. The only way to determine if it works is to test it against appropriate controls (that is, scientifically).’

Questions 14-19

Look at the following views (Questions 14—19) and the list of people below them.

Match each view with the person expressing it in the passage.

Write the correct letter A—E in boxes 14-19 on your answer sheet.

NB You may use any letter more than once.

14  Complementary medicine provides something that conventional medicine no longer does.

15  It is hard for people to know whether they are being told the truth or nor.

16  Certain kinds of complementary and alternative medicine are taken seriously because of the number of people making money from them.

17  Nothing can be considered a form of medicine unless it has been proved effective.

18  It seems likely that some forms of alternative medicine do work.

19  One particular kind of alternative medicine is a deliberate attempt to cheat the public.

 
 List of People

A Dr Romke Bron

B a molecular biologist from the University of Warwick

C Dr Stephen Nurrish

D a neuroscientist at King’s College London E Professor David Moore

Questions 20-22

Complete each sentence with the correct ending A-F from the box below.

Write the correct letter A-F in boxes 20-22 on your answer sheet.

20  The British Association for the Advancement of Science will be discussing the issue of

21  A recent survey conducted by a certain organisation addressed the issue of

22  The survey in which the writer of the article was involved gave information on

 
A what makes people use complementary rather than conventional medicine.’

B how many scientists themselves use complementary and alternative medicine.

C whether alternative medicine should be investigated scientifically.

D research into the use of complementary and conventional medicine together.

E how many people use various kinds of complementary medicine.

F the extent to which attitudes to alternative medicine are changing

Questions 23—26

Classify the following information as being given about

A acupuncture
B aromatherapy
C herbalism
D homoeopathy

Write the correct letter, A, B, C or D in boxes 23-26 on your answer sheet.
23  scientists believe that it is ineffective but harmless.

24  Scientists felt that it could he added to the group of therapies that deserved to be provided with resources for further investigation.

25  Scientists felt that it deserved to be taken seriously because of the organised way in which it has developed.

26  A number of scientists had used it, but harsh criticism was expressed about it


Section 3 
  

You should spend about 20 minutes on Questions 27—40 which are based on Reading Passage 3 on the following pages.

Questions 27-32

Reading Passage 3 has six paragraphs A-F.

Choose the correct heading for each paragraph from the list of headings below.

Write the correct number i-x in boxes 27-32 on your answer sheet.

 
  List of Headings
i  An easily understood system
ii Doubts dismissed
iii Not a totally unconventional view
iv Theories compared
v A momentous occasion
vi A controversial use of terminology
Vii Initial confusion
viii Previous beliefs replaced
ix More straightforward than expected
X An obvious thing to do

 

27 Paragraph A
28 Paragraph B
29 Paragraph C
30 Paragraph D
31 Paragraph E
32 Paragraph F

The cloud messenger

At six o’clock one evening in December 1802, in a dank and cavernous laboratory in London, an unknown young amateur meteorologist gave the lecture that teas to make him famous

A Luke Howard had been speaking for nearly an hour, during which time his audience had found itself in a state of gradually mounting excitement. By the time that he reached the concluding words of his address, the Plough Court laboratory was in an uproar. Everyone in the audience had recognized the importance of what they had just heard, and all were in a mood to have it confirmed aloud by their friends and neighbours in the room. Over the course of the past hour, they had been introduced not only to new explanations of the formation and lifespan of clouds, but also to a poetic new terminology: ‘Cirrus’, ‘Stratus’, ‘Cumulus’, ‘Nimbus’, and the other names, too, the names of intermediate compounds and modified forms, whose differences were based on altitude, air temperature and the shaping powers of upward radiation. There was much that needed to be taken on board.

B Clouds, as everyone in the room would already have known, were staging posts m the rise and fall of water as it made its way on endless compensating journeys between the earth and the fruitful sky. Yet the nature of the means of their exact construction remained a mystery to most observers who, on the whole, were still in thrall to the vesicular or ‘bubble’ theory that had dominated meteorological thinking for the better part of a century. The earlier speculations, in all their strangeness, had mostly been forgotten or were treated as historical curiosities to be glanced at, derided and then abandoned. Howard, however, was adamant that clouds were formed from actual solid drops of water and ice, condensed from their vaporous forms by the fall in temperature which they encountered as they ascended through the rapidly cooling lower atmosphere. Balloon pioneers during the 1780s had continued just how cold it could get up in the realm of the clouds: the temperature fell some 6.5″C for every thousand metres they ascended. By the rime the middle of a major cumulus cloud had been reached, the temperature would have dropped to below freezing, while the oxygen concentration of the air would be starting to thin quire dangerously. That was what the balloonists meant by ‘dizzy heights’.

C Howard was not, of course, the first to insist that clouds were best understood as entities with physical properties of their own, obeying the same essential laws which governed the rest of the natural world (with one or two interesting anomalies: water, after all, is a very strange material). It had long been accepted by many of the more scientifically minded that clouds, despite their distance and their seeming intangibility, should be studied and apprehended like any other objects in creation.

D There was more, however, and better. Luke Howard also claimed that there was a fixed and constant number of basic cloud types, and this number was not (as the audience might have anticipated) in the hundreds or the thousands, like the teeming clouds themselves, with each as individual as a thumbprint. Had this been the case, it would render them both unclassifiable and unaccountable; just so many stains upon the sky. Howard’s claim, on the contrary, was that there were just three basic families of cloud, into which every one of the thousands of ambiguous forms could be categorized with certainty. The clouds obeyed a system and, once recognized in outline, their basic forms would be ‘as distinguishable from each other as a tree from a hill, or the latter from a lake’, for each displayed the simplest possible visual characteristics.

E The names which Howard devised tor them were designed to convey a descriptive sense of each cloud type’s outward characteristics (a practice derived from the usual procedures of natural history classification), and were taken from the Latin, for ease of adoption by the learned of different nations’: Cirrus (from the Latin for fibre or hair), Cumulus (from the Latin for heap or pile) and Stratus (from the Latin for layer or sheet). Clouds were thus divided into tendrils, heaps and layers: the three formations at the heart of their design. Howard then went on to name four other cloud types, all of which were either modifications or aggregates of the three major families of formation. Clouds continually unite, pass into one another and disperse, but always in recognizable stages. The rain cloud Nimbus, for example (from the Latin for cloud), was, according to Howard, a rainy combination of all three types, although Nimbus was reclassified as nimbostratus by meteorologists in 1932, by which time the science of rain had developed beyond all recognition.

The modification of clouds was a major new idea, and what struck the audience most vividly about it was its elegant and powerful fittingness. All of what they had just heard seemed so clear and so self-evident. Some must have wondered how it was that no one – not even in antiquity – had named or graded the clouds before, or if they had, why their efforts had left no trace in the language. How could it he that the task had been waiting for Howard, who had succeeded in wringing a kind of exactitude from out of the vaporous clouds? Their forms, though shapeless and unresolved, had at last, it seemed, been securely grasped. Howard had given a set of names to a radical fluidity and impermanence that seemed every bit as magical, to that first audience, as the Eskimo’s fabled vocabulary of snow.

 

Questions 33-36

Label the diagram below.

Choose NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS AND/OR A NUMBER from the passage for each answer.

Write your answers in boxes 33—36 on your answer sheet.

33. Reaching situation known as the 33………………………. .

35. not much 35………………………. .

36. temperature down 36…………………….. per …………………….. .

 

ieltsmaterial.com - ielts reading practice 29
Questions 37-40

Reading Passage 3 has six paragraphs labelled A-F

Which paragraph contains the following information?

Write the correct letter A-F in boxes 37-40 on your answer sheet.

NB You may use any letter more than once.

37  an example of a modification made to work done by Howard

38  a comparison between Howard’s work and another classification system.

39  a reference to the fact that Howard presented a very large amount of information

40  an assumption that the audience asked themselves a question

 

ANSWER KEY FOR IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST

READING Passage 1

Questions 1-5

1  Answer: timing

Note 3sr paragraph, 2nd sentence: ‘Synchronising the subtitles to the dialogue and pictures’ means ‘matching the subtitles to what is said and seen’.

2  Answer: insert; delete

Note 3rd paragraph: ‘You insert… disappear.’ You press the insert key to record the time on the tape when you want the subtitle to appear on the screen, and the delete key to record the time on the tape when you want it to disappear from the screen.

3  Answer: (a) manual review

Note 3rd paragraph: ‘This process is then …’. After setting the places where each subtitle appears and disappears, you then check each one by pressing the necessary keys.

4  Answer: synchronisation

Note 3rd paragraph: This process is then …’. While checking all the subtitles, some may be ‘adjusted’ (changed a bit) to ‘improve synchronisation’ – to make sure that the subtitles match the dialogue and the pictures better.

5  Answer: spotting list

Note 5th paragraph: This is all the subtitles in English, all timed to fit in at the correct places in the film; these subtitles are then translated info the required language by a translator, who does not have to fit them into the correct places because this has already been done.

Questions 6-9

6  Answer: TRUE

Note 1st paragraph: ‘As translating goes … DVD’. The writer says that if you work as a translator, there is nothing more ‘entertaining or glamorous’ than subtitling films. The best work is on new blockbuster films before they come out, but you are also lucky if you work on films being translated for video or DVD. All translators therefore want to do any work that involves subtitling films.

7  Answer: TRUE

Note 3rd paragraph: ‘You have to be more concise’, you have to say things in fewer words than in traditional translation work.

8  Answer: FALSE

Note 4th paragraph: Two different methods are described. The second is said to be ‘just a different method’, which means that it is neither better nor worse than the first. It is simply a different approach. The two methods are therefore equally effective.

9  Answer: NOT GIVEN

Note Last paragraph: Comedies are said to be particularly difficult to translate and provide subtitles for, but we are not told whether or not only a few people manage to do it successfully.

► Questions 10—13

10  Answer: the source language

Note 6th paragraph: ‘Mistakes usually occur… If the translator ‘does not master’ (is not excellent at) the source language, they will make mistakes when subtitling.

11 Answer: reformat the timing

Note 6th paragraph: ‘If subtitles were done … ‘. The timing of the subtitles has to be changed when a video version of the film is made because the subtitles for the film version may not match those required for the video version for technical reasons.

12  Answer: thin black border

Note 7th paragraph: ‘Characters usually appear… A border is something that surrounds something. Most subtitles have white letters with a thin black border round them, we are told.

13  Answer: the hearing impaired

Note 7th paragraph: We can also use … The words spoken by different characters can be put into different colours for each character, so that people who are deaf or cannot hear well will know which character Is speaking while they are reading the subtitles.

READING Passage 2

Question 14-19

14  Answer: C

Note 10th paragraph: Dr Nurrish says that complementary medicine gives people the chance to ‘talk to someone and be listened to sympathetically’, and that this opportunity is ‘lacking’ (Is not available) in medicine In general.

15  Answer: A

Note 7th paragraph: Dr Bron says that in the field of alternative medicine, ‘the general public has a hard time to distinguish between scientific myth and fact’. Some things they are told are not true, but they may not know that.

16  Answer: D

Note 11th paragraph: The neuroscientist has a ‘withering’

(very critical) opinion of alternative medicine. He says that the only difference between aromatherapy (‘the latter’) and the other kinds of therapy he mentions is that aromatherapy has a ‘cadre of professional practitioners’ – there are a number of people who earn a living from aromatherapy – whereas this is not the case with the other kinds of therapy. He suggests that the other kinds of therapy are not taken seriously and that aromatherapy should not be taken seriously either.

17  Answer: E

Note Last paragraph: Professor Moore says ‘there should be no such thing as complementary or alternative medicine’ – it should not exist. He thinks that every form of treatment that has been scientifically proved to work should be considered medicine and that any form of treatment that has not been scientifically tested cannot be considered medicine of any kind.

18  Answer: B

Note 8th paragraph: The molecular biologist says that there is enough ‘anecdotal evidence'(evidence from what people have said about their own experiences) that some alternative therapies ‘are effective'(do work) and that therefore research should be done into them.

19  Answer: A

Note 5th paragraph: Dr Bron says that homoeopathy is a ‘scam’ (a clever and illegal way of cheating people out of money), and that claims made about the content of homoeopathic treatments cannot be trusted.

Questions 20-22

20  Answer: C

Note 1st paragraph: ‘This’ at the beginning of the last sentence refers to the question of whether complementary or alternative medicine can be considered to ‘warrant’ (deserve) ‘scientific investigation’ and whether scientists should ‘conduct research’ into it.

21  Answer: E

Note 2nd paragraph: The Mintel survey found that one in five British people (20%) used complementary medicine, so, clearly, the number of people using it was one of the subjects of that survey.

22  Answer: B

Note 3rd paragraph: The writer says that ‘our sample’ – the scientists asked in the survey the writer was involved in – used complementary medicine more than the general public. It therefore tried to find out how many scientists used it.

Questions 23-26

Task location: Spread throughout the text

23  Answer: D

Note 6th paragraph: Scientists felt that homoeopathy has not been definitely proved to work and are ‘baffled by how’ – they cannot understand how – it could be effective, but they think it has ‘no side effects’ – no unpleasant and unintended results.

24  Answer: C

Note 9th paragraph: The scientists felt that acupuncture, chiropractic and osteopathy should all receive money for research, ‘as should herbalism’ – and herbalism should receive money for research too.

25  Answer: A

Note 4th paragraph: Acupuncture is said to be one of the ‘more established areas’ that scientists ‘place more trust in’ because they have ‘professional bodies’ (organisations to run them) and ‘recognised training’.

26   Answer: D

Note 5th paragraph: ‘Some of the comments … scathing’. The writer says that 10% of the scientists they asked in their survey had used homoeopathy, but that comments made about it were ‘scathing’ (extremely critical).

READING Passage 3

► Questions 27—32

27  Answer: v

Note A ‘momentous occasion’ is an important event that has important results. The paragraph describes the event – Luke Howard’s talk at the laboratory – and its effect on the audience, who realised that what they were hearing was of great importance.

28  Answer: viii

Note The paragraph refers to theories about cloud formation that people were still ‘in thrall to’ (still strongly believed in), such as the vesicular or bubble theory. Howard’s ideas showed these theories to be incorrect. In addition, the popular theories at the time had replaced the ‘earlier speculations’ – theories that had appeared before them but were now forgotten or considered strange.

29  Answer: iii

Note It is stated in the paragraph that Howard’s theory that clouds should be regarded as having things in common with the rest of the natural world was not a new one, and that ‘many of the more scientifically minded’ people held the same view.

30  Answer: ix

Note We are told that people may have thought that classifying clouds would involve hundreds or thousands of different types of cloud, but that Howard showed that there were ‘just three basic families of cloud’. Therefore, he showed that classifying clouds was a less complex matter than people might have expected.

31  Answer: i

Note At the beginning of the paragraph, we are told that Howard’s system for classifying clouds involved giving them names that were connected with what they looked like and using Latin names because people of many nationalities would understand them. The rest of the paragraph gives examples of his names.

32  Answer: x

Note We are told that Howard’s system was ‘clear and self-evident’ to the audience and that, because it was so clearly the right way to describe clouds, they wondered why nobody had done it before.

Questions 33-36

33  Answer: dizzy heights

Note Paragraph B, last sentence. This is what the situation shown in the diagram was called by balloonists, we are told.

34  Answer: major cumulus cloud

Note The situation described is when a balloon has gone up so high in the sky that it ¡s now in the middle of this type of cloud.

35  Answer: oxygen

Note At this point, the ‘oxygen concentration’ in the air begins to ‘thin quite dangerously’ – there begins to be so little oxygen that breathing becomes difficult.

36  Answer: 6.5°C; thousand/1000 metres

Note As the balloon goes up into the air, the air temperature goes down at the rate described.

Questions 37-40

37  Answer: E

Note Paragraph E, last sentence: The cloud type that Howard called Nimbus was later given a different name – nimbostratus – by meteorologists.

38  Answer: F

Note Paragraph F, last sentence: Howard’s system for naming clouds is said to have been similar in a way to the system of words used by Eskimos for different types of snow.

39  Answer: A

Note The paragraph lists all the kinds of information that Howard gave. In the last sentence, we are told that there was ‘much that needed to be taken on board’, which means that there was a lot of information for the audience to understand and think about.

40  Answer: F

Note ‘Some must have wondered…’. The writer is saying that he is certain that people in the audience asked themselves why nobody had come up with a system for naming and grading clouds before Howard.

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IELTS Reading Practice Test 29 with Answers

READING PASSAGE 1

You should spend about 20 minutes on Questions 1 – 13, which are based on Reading Passage 1 below.

A

The climate of the Earth is always changing. In the past it has altered as a result of nat­ural causes. Nowadays, however, the term ‘climate change’ is generally used when referring to changes in our climate which have been identified since the early part of the twentieth century. The changes we’ve seen over recent years and those which are predicted to occur over the next 100 years are thought by many to be largely a result of human behavior rather than due to natural changes in the atmosphere. And this is what is so significant about current climactic trends; never before has man played such a significant role in determining long-term weather patterns – we are entering the unknown and there is no precedent for what might happen next.

B

The greenhouse effect is very important when we talk about climate change as it relates to the gases which keep the Earth warm. Although the greenhouse effect is a naturally occurring phenomenon, it is believed that the effect could be intensified by human activity and the emission of gases into the atmosphere. It is the extra green­house gases which humans have released which are thought to pose the strongest threat. Certain researchers, such as Dr Michael Crawley, argue: ‘even though this nat­ural phenomenon does exist it is without a doubt human activity that has worsened its effect; this is evident when comparing data regarding the earth’s temperature in the last one hundred years with the one hundred years prior to that.’ Some scientists, however, dispute this as Dr Ray Ellis suggests: ‘human activity may be contributing a small amount to climate change but this increase in temperature is an unavoidable fact based on the research data we have compiled.

C

Scientists around the globe are look­ing at all the evidence surrounding climate change and using advanced technology have come up with pre­dictions for our future environment and weather. The next stage of that work, which is just as important, is looking at the knock-on effects of potential changes. For example, are we likely to see an increase in precip­itation and sea levels? Does this mean there will be an increase in flooding and what can we do to protect ourselves from that? How will our health be affected by climate change, how will agricultural practices change and how will wildlife cope? What will the effects on coral be? Professor Max Leonard has suggested, ‘while it may be controversial some would argue that climate change could bring with it positive effects as well as negative ones’.

D

There are many institutions around the world whose sole priority is to take action against these environmental problems. Green Peace is the organisation that is probably the most well-known. It is an international organisation that campaigns in favour of researching and promoting solutions to climate change, exposes the companies and governments that are blocking action, lobbies to change national and international policy, and bears witness to the impacts of unnecessary destruction and detrimental human activity.

E

The problem of climate change is without a doubt something that this generation and the generations to come need to deal with. Fortunately, the use of renewable energy is becoming increasingly popular, which means that less energy is consumed as renewable energy is generated from natural resources—such as sunlight, wind, rain, tides, and geo­thermal heat—which can be naturally replenished. Another way to help the environment, in terms of climate change, is by travelling light. Walking or riding a bike instead of driv­ing a car uses fewer fossil fuels which release carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. In addi­tion, using products that are made from recycled paper, glass, metal and plastic reduces carbon emissions because they use less energy to manufacture than products made from completely new materials. Recycling paper also saves trees and lets them continue to limit climate change naturally as they remain in the forest, where they remove carbon from the atmosphere. Professor Mark Halton, who has completed various studies in this field, has stated: ‘with all this information and the possible action that we can take, it isn’t too late to save our planet from over-heating and the even worse side-effects of our own activity

Question 1 – 5

Reading Passage 1 has 5 paragraphs, A – E. Which paragraph contains the following information? Write the correct letter A – E in the boxes below.

NB You may use any letter more than once.

  1. A natural phenomenon that could also affect climate change.
  2. Steps we can take to help reverse the situation.
  3. An explanation of what climate change is.
  4. Organisations that want to help.
  5. Possible effects of climate change.

Question 6 -9

Look at the following people (Questions 6 -9) and the list of statements below. Match each person with the correct statement, A – F.

  1. Professor Max Leonard
  2. Dr Michael Crawley
  3. Professor Mark Halton
  4. Dr Ray Ellis

A. We have the ability to change the situation

B. Climate Change is Inevitable

C. Humans have made the situation much worse

D. Climate Change might not be all bad

E. Human activity and natural weather phenomena

F. While we may not be too late to save our planet, there are bound to be some extreme side-effects of past human activity one way or the other


Questions 10-13 

Write the correct letter, A – F, in spaces 6-9.

Do the following statements agree with the information given in Reading Passage 1? In spaces 10-13 below, write

YES                                        if the statements agrees with the information

NO                                          If the statements contradicts the information

NOT GIVEN                          if there is no information on this

  1. Man is not entirely responsible for global warming.
  2. Scientists have come up with new evidence about the negative effects of carbon-free sources of energy such as nuclear power
  3. One of the purposes of Green Peace is to find out which companies and governments are doing things which don’t help the actions of environmentalists.
  4. Most people aren’t willing to start using renewable energy.

READING PASSAGE 2

You should spend about 20 minutes on Questions 14 – 26, which are based on Reading Passage 2 below.

PRIVATE SCHOOLS

Most countries’ education systems have had what you might call educational disasters, but, sadly, in many areas of certain countries these ‘disasters’ are still evident today. The English education system is unique due to the fact that there are still dozens of schools which are known as private schools and they perpetuate privilege and social division. Most countries have some private schools for the children of the wealthy; England is able to more than triple the average number globally. England has around 3,000 private schools and just under half a million children are educated at them whilst some nine million children are educated at state schools. The over­whelming majority of students at private schools also come from middle-class families.

The result of this system is evident and it has much English history embedded within it. The facts seem to speak for themselves. In the private system almost half the students go on to University, whilst in the state sys­tem only about eight per cent make it to further educa­tion. However, statistics such as these can be deceptive due to the fact that middle-class children do better at examinations than working class ones, and most of them stay on at school after 16. Private schools therefore have the advantage over state schools as they are entirely ‘middle class’, and this creates an environment of success where students work harder and apply them­selves more diligently to their school work.

Private schools are extortionately expensive, being as much as £18,000 a year at somewhere such as Harrow or Eton, where Princes William and Harry attended, and at least £8,000 a year almost everywhere else. There are many parents who are not wealthy or even comfortably off but are willing to sacrifice a great deal in the cause of their children’s schooling. It baffles many people as to why they need to spend such vast amounts when there are perfectly acceptable state schools that don’t cost a penny. One father gave his reasoning for sending his son to a private school, ‘If my son gets a five-percent-better chance of going to University then that may be the dif­ference between success and failure.” It would seem to the average person that a £50,000 minimum total cost of second level educa­tion is a lot to pay for a five-percent-better chance. Most children, given the choice, would take the money and spend it on more enjoyable things rather than shelling it out on a school that is too posh for its own good

However, some say that the real reason that parents fork out the cash is prejudice: they don’t want their little kids mixing with the “workers”, or picking up an undesirable accent. In addition to this, it wouldn’t do if at the next din­ner party all the guests were boasting about sending their kids to the same place where the son of the third cousin of Prince Charles is going, and you say your kid is going to the state school down the road, even if you could pocket the money for yourself instead, and, as a result, be able to serve the best Champagne with the smoked salmon and duck.

It is a fact, however, that at many of the best private schools, your money buys you something. One school, with 500 pupils, has 11 science laboratories; another school with 800 pupils, has 30 music practice rooms; another has 16 squash courts, and yet another has its own beach. Private schools spend £300 per pupil a year on invest­ment in buildings and facilities; the state system spends less than £50. On books, the ratio is 3 to 1.

One of the things that your money buys which is difficult to quantify is the appearance of the school, the way it looks. Most private schools that you will find are set in beautiful, well-kept country houses, with extensive grounds and gardens. In comparison with the state schools, they tend to look like castles, with the worst of the state schools looking like public lavatories, perhaps even tiled or covered in graffiti. Many may even have an architectural design that is just about on the level of an industrial shed

Question 14 – 20

Choose the correct letter A, B, C or D.

  1. The English educational system differs from the other ones because

A. it tries to make state and private equal.

B. more students are educated at private schools than state schools

C. it contributes to creating a class system within society.

D. it is more expensive to run

15. There are more private school children who go to university because

A. the lessons and teachers at the private schools are much better.

B. their parents often send their children to private schools

C. they have more teaching hours

D. the school create a successful environment.

16. A lot of parents often send their children to private schools

A.because they are not well-informed.

B. to show how much money they have to their friends

C. to increase their chances of succeeding in the university exams.

D. because of the better sports facilities.

17. It is suggested that some parents of children at private schools are

A. prejudiced and superficial.

B.more intelligent that those with children at state schools.

C.well-brought-up and cultivated.

D. overly protective.

18. Private school

A. always have their own beaches.

B. teach sports that state schools do not.

C. spend more money per student than stateschools.

D. spend more money on hiring good teachers.

19. writer thinks that private-school buildings

A. are very attractive and luxurious.

B.generally do not look very nice.

C. are too big for the amount of students who attend the school.

D. are not built to suit student’s needs.

20. In general, what do you think the writer’s opinion of private schools is?

A. It isn’t fair that those without money can’t attend them.

B. They divide social classes but they offer better facilities and a more creative environment.

C. There is little difference between private and state schools.

D. They have the best teachers.

Questions 21 – 26

Complete the sentences below.

Choose ONE WORD ONLY from the passage for each answer.

The fact that there are so many private schools in England, in comparison to other countries, makes the English educational system 21__________Most students in these schools are from 22 __________ families. These students seem to do better at exams although statistics can be 23__________One of the advantages of private schools is that they seem to provide students with a better, more positive environment that encourages them to 24__________themselves to their school work with more enthusiasm. A lot of not very well-off parents make huge sacrifices for their children’s 25__________ to help them go to respectable universities. Unfortunately, many state school buildings sometimes have the appearance of an industrial 26

READING PASSAGE 3

You should spend about 20 minutes on Questions 27 – 40, which are based on Reading Passage 3 below.

Martin Luther King

A

Martin Luther King was born on January 15, 1929, in Atlanta, Georgia. He was the son of the Reverend Martin Luther King, Sr. and Alberta Williams King. He had an older sister, Willie Christine King, and a younger brother Alfred Daniel Williams King. Growing up in Atlanta, King attended Booker T. Washington High School. He skipped ninth and twelfth grade, and entered Morehouse College at age fifteen without formally graduating from high school. From the time that Martin was born, he knew that black people and white people had different rights in certain parts of America. If a black family wanted to eat at a restaurant, they had to sit in a separate section of the restaurant. They had to sit at the back of the cinema, and even use separate toilets. Worse, and perhaps even more humiliating still, in many southern states, if a black man was on a bus and all the seats were taken, he would have to endure the indignity of relinquishing his own seat to a white man. King could never understand the terrible injustice of this.

In 1948, he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology. Later, King began doctoral studies in systematic theology at Boston University and received his Doctor of Philosophy on June 5, 1955. King married Coretta Scott, on June 18, 1953 and they had four children.

B

Returning to the South to become pastor of a Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama, King first achieved national renown when he helped mobilise the black boycott of the Montgomery bus system in 1955. This was organised after Rosa Parks, a black woman, refused to give up her seat on the bus to a white man – in the segregated south, black people could only sit at the back of the bus. The 382-day boycott led the bus company to change its regulations, and the Supreme Court declared such segrega­tion unconstitutional.

C

In 1957 King was active in the organisation of the Southern Leadership Christian Conference (SCLC), formed to co-ordinate protests against discrimination. He advocated non-violent direct action based on the methods of Gandhi, who led protests against British rule in India culminating in India’s independence in 1947. In 1963, King led mass protests against dis­criminatory practices in Birmingham, Alabama, where the white population were violently resisting desegregation. The city was dubbed ‘Bombingham’ as attacks against civil rights protesters increased, and King was arrested and jailed for his part in the protests.

D

After his release, King participated in the enormous civil rights march, in Washington, in August 1963, and delivered his famous ‘I have a dream’ speech, predicting a day when the promise of freedom and equality for all would become a reality in America. In 1964 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In 1965, he led a campaign to register blacks to vote. The same year the US Congress passed the Voting Rights Act out­lawing the discriminatory practices that had barred blacks from voting in the south.

E

As the civil rights movement became increasingly radicalised, King found that his message of peaceful protest was not shared by many in the younger generation. King began to protest against the Vietnam War and poverty levels in the US. On March 29, 1968, King went to Memphis, Tennessee, in support of the black sanitary public works employees who had been on strike since March 12 for higher wages and better treat­ment. In one incident, black street repair­men had received pay for two hours when they were sent home because of bad weath­er, but white employees had been paid for the full day. King could not bear to stand by and let such patent acts of racism go unno­ticed. He moved to unite his people, and all the peoples of America on the receiving end of discriminatory practices, to protest for their rights, peacefully but steadfastly.

F

On his trip to Memphis, King was booked into room 306 at the Lorraine Motel, owned by Walter Bailey. King was shot at 6:01 p.m. April 4, 1968 while he was standing on the motel’s second-floor balcony. King was rushed to St. Joseph’s Hospital, where doc­tors opened his chest and performed manu­al heart massage. He was pronounced dead at 7:05 p.m. King’s autopsy revealed that although he was only 39 years old, he had the heart of a 60-year-old man.

Questions 27 – 31

Choose the correct letter A, B, C or D.

  1. From a young age Martin Luther King

A       wanted to protest for the rights of black people.

B       could not understand why black people were treated differently.

C       was not allowed to go to the cinema or to restaurants.

D       was aware that black people were being humiliated in many northern states.

28. What initially made Martin Luther King famous?

A       the black boycott of the Montgomery bus system

B       becoming a pastor at a Baptist Church

C       when Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a bus

D       when he persuaded Rosa Parks not to give up her bus  seat  to a white man

  1. What influenced Martin Luther King regarding non-violence?

A       India’s independence in 1947

B       Christianity

C       the Southern Leadership Christian Conference

D       the methods of Gandhi

30. What did Martin Luther King fight for in 1965?

A the right of black people to vote

B the actions of the US Congress

C the right to win the Nobel Peace Prize

D the right of black people to travel abroad

31. How did Martin Luther King feel about the civil rights movement?

A       It was helping the war in Vietnam.

B       It brought the younger generation together.

C       It had been exploited by politicians who wanted to get    more votes.

D       The protesters sometimes behaved too violently.

Questions 32 – 34

Do the following statements agree with the information given in Reading Passage 3? In spaces 32 – 34 below, write

YES                                        if the statements agrees with the information

NO                                          If the statements contradicts the information

NOT GIVEN                          if there is no information on this

32. The black boycott of the Montgomery bus system was a success.

33. In 1963 the white people in Alabama wanted desegregation.

34. Martin Luther King achieved a lot in his protest against the Vietnam War.

Questions 35 – 40

Reading Passage 3 has 6 paragraphs.

Choose the correct heading for each paragraph A – F, from the list of headings. Write the correct number, i – viii, in spaces 35 – 40 below.

35. Paragraph A

36. Paragraph

37. Paragraph C

38. Paragraph D

39.Paragraph E

40. Paragraph F

  1. the memorable speec
  2. Unhappy about violence
  3. A tragic incident
  4. Protests and action
  5. The background of an iconic man
  6. Making his mark internationally
  7. Difficult childhood
  8. Black street repairmen


ANSWER FOR IELTS READING PRACTICE TEST

Reading Passage 1
Justification of the Answers
1. B. “The greenhouse effect is very important when we talk about climate change… the greenhouse effect is a naturally occurring phenomenon”.
2. E. The paragraph discusses use of renewable energy, using less fossil fuel and recycling as examples of actions that can be taken.
3. A. The paragraph defines climate change as “changes in our climate which have been identified since the early part of the twentieth century”.
4. D. “There are many institutions around the world whose sole priority is to take action against these environmental problems”.
5. C. “looking at the knock-on effects of potential changes. For example, are we likely to see an increase in precipitation and sea levels?”
6. D. Paragraph C. “Professor Max Leonard has suggested, ‘while it may be controversial some would argue that climate change could bring with it positive effects as well as negative ones’”.
7. C. Paragraph B. “such as Dr Michael Crawley, argue: ‘even though this natural phenomenon does exist it is without a doubt human activity that has worsened its effects…”.
8. A. Paragraph E. “with all this information and the possible action we can take. It isn’t too late to save our planet”.
9. B. Paragraph B. “Dr Ray Ellis suggests: ‘human activity may be contributing a small amount to climate change but this increase in temperature is an unavoidable fact”.
10. Yes. Paragraph B. ’although the greenhouse effect is a nat¬urally occurring phenomenon, it is believed that the effect could be intensified by human activity and the emission of gases into the atmosphere”.
11. Not Given. There is no mention about nuclear energy.
12. Yes. Paragraph D. “Green Peace is an organisation that … exposes the companies and governments that are blocking action”.
13. No. Paragraph E. “Fortunately, the use of renewable energy is becoming increasingly popular”.

Reading Passage 2
Justification of the Answers
14. C. Paragraph 1. “Dozens of schools which are known as private schools … perpetuate privilege and social division”.
15. D. Paragraph 2. “Private schools therefore have the advan¬tage._ as they are entirely ‘middle class’ and this creates an environment of success”.
16. C. Paragraph 3. ‘If my son gets a five-percent-better chance of going to University then that may be the difference between success and failure.”
17. A. Paragraph 4. “The real reason that parents fork out the cash is prejudice” and the desire to conform to dinner party conventions.
18. C. Paragraph 6. “Private schools spend £300 per pupil a year on investment in buildings and facilities; the state system spends less than £50”.
19. A. Paragraph 7. “Most private schools that you will find are set in beautiful, well-kept country houses, with extensive grounds and gardens”.
20. B. Paragraph 1. Private schools ‘perpetuate social division’ and in Paragraph 5, the writer describes facilities such as la¬boratories, music rooms, squash courts etc.
21. Paragraph 1 The English education system is unique due to the fact. „. as private schools’
22. Paragraph 1: ‘The overwhelming majority of students _ come from middle-class families.’
23. Paragraph 2: ‘However, statistics such as these can be deceptive…’
24. Paragraph 2: ‘apply themselves more diligently to their school work.’
25. Paragraph 3: ‘There are many parents _.. Children’s schooling.’
26. Paragraph 7: ‘Many may _. Is just about on the level of an industrial shed.’

Reading Passage 3
Justification of the Answers
27. B. Paragraph 1. “If a black family wanted to eat at a res¬taurant, they had to sit in a separate section of the restaurant … King could never understand this”.
28. A. Paragraph 2. “King first achieved national renown when he helped mobilise the black boycott of the Montgomery bus system”.
29. D. Paragraph 3. “He advocated non-violent direct action based on the methods of Gandhi”.
30. A. Paragraph 4. “In 1965, he led a campaign to register blacks to vote”.
31. D. Paragraph 5. “King found that his message of peaceful protest was not shared by many in the younger generation”.
32. Yes. Paragraph 2. “The 382-day boycott led the bus com¬pany to change its regulations, and the Supreme Court declared such segregation unconstitutional”.
33. No. Paragraph 3.1’… in Birmingham, Alabama, where the white population were violently resisting desegregation.1
34. Not Given. Paragraph 5. We only know he began to protest about the Vietnam War but there is no information about the outcome of the protest.
35. v. Paragraph A. describes his birthplace, family and educa¬tion, comprising his background.
36. iv. Paragraph B. gives details about the protest and boycott of the Montgomery bus system.
37. ii. Paragraph C. “He advocated non-violent direct action”.
38. i. Paragraph D. “in August 1963, and delivered his famous ‘I have a dream’ speech”.
39. vi. Paragraph E. “King began to protest against the Vietnam War”.
40. iii. Paragraph F. “into room 306 at the Lorraine motel King was shot

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